30 Reasons Why You Must Delight Your Customers

It very often occurs that managers and employees are not totally convinced that there is a payoff to having delighted, (versus unhappy or indifferent,) customers. Here is a compelling list of some of the reasons that you can use to persuade them:

1.
The profitability of the business improves, because delighted customers keep coming back, which means that we keep all of their current and future business. Their loyalty is not fragile and mobile as it is when they are unhappy or merely satisfied. They are less likely to defect to our competitors, even for a better price, and also don’t share strategic information about us with our competitors. Delighted customers may even go so far as to defend us when we are attacked by competitors. And they are less likely to suffer from “buyer’s remorse,” a common problem which many marketers face.

2.
Customers that remain longer in our business spend proportionately more than new customers, and are far less price-sensitive. They are open to new products and services, dealing with new people, and participating in new systems and processes which help us to become more effective.

3.
The business transactions of delighted customers are routine, and they tend to be more cooperative by paying their accounts on time, and by treating our premises, property, equipment and associates with more respect. Unhappy and indifferent customers, on the other hand, tend to threaten legal and other actions, want to go straight to the top of our company to complain, find ways to show us “who is in charge,” and feel a need to get back at us when they are upset.

4.
When mistakes sometimes happen, delighted customers are far more forgiving and tolerant. When they have been previously disappointed or feel betrayed, however, they will certainly be upset. Thus, they nit-pick, and start looking for other “wrong” things which they might not previously have noticed.

5.
Because we get to know delighted customers better over time, and because they are more willing to share their perceptions and ideas, we are more likely to get feedback that is useful for our growth and development, and to generate new ideas to enhance our products and services. This gives us an opportunity to be more innovative and proactive in launching new products, in training our people, in improving our systems and processes, and in introducing value-adding strategies for market leadership.

6.
Delighted customers tell many other potential customers, using many media, as well as the internet, about their positive experiences, building our reputation and credibility. On the other hand, unhappy customers tell a huge number of people, and exaggerate their stories, with all of the concomitant damage. Of course, satisfied customers tell nobody.

7.
This free word-of-mouth advertising and publicity means that we don’t have to spend fortunes on our own advertising and promotional campaigns. We also don’t have to spend as much money on sales commission, price cuts, and other sales tactics to attract customers.

8.
The communication of delighted customers with our staff tends to be more positive and encouraging, and this has a very positive effect on motivation and morale. Staff turnover and unhappiness reduces, and teamwork and cooperation increase. In addition, staff feel good working in a company where the future is more secure, and where they don’t have to deal with anger and unhappiness all of the time. They like being part of a winning team.

9.
The quality of management improves because managers don’t have to spend time scrambling around to investigate problems, reassure customers and apologise, offer compensation, fight fires, deal with crises, discipline staff, and sort out systems issues.

10.
Competitors, on the other hand, have to keep offering more and more expensive incentives to lure them away. Eventually, competitors become demoralized and give up the fight. They are prepared to play second fiddle to our superiority, and may even decide to pull out of the game altogether. Alternatively, they become weakened and ready to be taken over.

11.
They are likely to keep coming back, which means that we keep all their current and future business. Thus, their loyalty is not fragile and mobile as it is when they are merely satisfied.

12.
In addition, customers that stay longer spend proportionately more than new customers, and are less price-sensitive.

13.
They are far more forgiving when things occasionally go wrong, and may even go so far as to defend us when we are attacked.

14.
Because we get to know them better over time, and because they are more willing to share their perceptions and ideas, we are more likely to get closer to really satisfying their needs, wants and desires.

15.
This also gives us an opportunity to be more innovative and proactive in launching new products, in training our people, in improving our systems and processes, and in introducing value-adding strategies for market leadership. They tend to be far more open to these things also.

16.
Over a period of time, they turn into partners rather than customers.

17.
They tell others, including the media, about their positive experiences, building our reputation and credibility.

18.
This free word-of-mouth advertising and publicity means that we don’t have to spend fortunes on our own advertising campaigns.

19.
Their communication with our staff tends to be more positive and encouraging, and this has a very positive effect on motivation and morale.

20.
In addition, staff feel good working in a company where the future is more secure, and where they don’t have to deal with anger and unhappiness all of the time. They like being part of a winning team.

21.
The quality of management improves because managers don’t have to spend time scrambling around investigating problems, reassuring customers, fighting fires, and offering compensation and apologies.

22.
We don’t have to spend as much money on promotions, sales commission, price cuts, and other sales tactics to attract them.

23.
They are less likely to defect to competitors, nor do they necessarily share strategic information about our business with competitors.

24.
Competitors, on the other hand, have to keep offering more and more expensive incentives to lure them away.

25.
Eventually, competitors become demoralized and give up the fight. They are prepared to play second fiddle to our superiority, and may even decide to pull out of the game altogether. Alternatively, they become weakened and ready to be taken over.

26.
Their business transactions are routine, and nobody needs to be employed just to chase after problems and unhappiness.

27.
They are more likely to pay their accounts on time.

28.
They tend to treat our premises, property, equipment and associates with more respect.

29.
They are less likely to suffer from “buyer’s remorse,” a common problem which many marketers face.

30.
We tend to avoid legal actions, threatened or real, which they use to get back at us when they are upset.

If this list of thirty serious consequences doesn’t persuade you to delight and thrill your customers with service, nothing will.

(If you’d like a more comprehensive list of reasons, then you may want to download the whitepaper on the ROI of Customer Management which is listed elsewhere.)


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